A Lady's Guide to the Art of Being a Wingman

The experience of watching this show is a bit like re-living a night out with your best female friends from university; it's full of the cringe-inducing mistakes and naiveté of youth.

★★★
comedy review | Read in About 2 minutes
30854_large
A Lady's Guide to the Art of Being a Wingman
Published 22 Aug 2016

The show opens to music by Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons: “Walk like a man, talk like a man”. But the next hour is all about how women grow up to the point where they can walk like a woman and talk like a woman. And be friends to each other. Or so the three female actors in giant pink beehive wigs tell us.

The experience of watching this show is a bit like re-living a night out with your best female friends from university while you’re all still in your first year together. The show is full of the same cringe-inducing mistakes and naiveté of youth.

A Lady’s Guide... takes the audience back to a time when few of us had much clue to forming a workable relationship with anyone of the opposite sex. Instead, same-sex friendships with a buddy or “wingman” provided much-needed emotional support.

The show centres around tracking the horrors of a night out for the three women. Their only form of guidance comes from a posh voice-over. The humour is silly, but the audience falls over itself with laughter at the jokes.

The show ends with all the girls confessing—surprise, surprise—that it didn’t quite work out with the guys they met. The girl who was a virgin has remained that way. “I didn’t want my first time to be care of an audiobook,” she says, a little sadly. Let’s face it, at times like these we all need a pal. And these beehived ladies are just that.

https://www.facebook.com/events/360566130809898/